GORSKI ADDICTION MODEL

April 26, 2016

  The Gorski Comprehensive Addiction Model is a a science-based system that incorporates both chemical and behavioral addictions in a comprehensive biopsychosocial perspective. 

THE HUMAN CONDITION: The Gorski Model builds upon a recognition that all addiction is based within the human condition. The human condition is organized and directed by the CORE HUMAN PROCESSES OF PERSONALITY

DEVELOPMENT. The human process begins with an intangible but self-evident primal life force which motivates human beings to survive and thrive in the physical world. The frustration resulting from the collision of the infinite potential of the human spirit with the finite limitation of the physical world results in ANGST, the normal pain of life and living. ANGST is managed by people in one of three ways: DENIAL, it doesn’t exist – everything is beautiful;

DEMORALIZATION, since life hurts I will just give up and stop trying; or MOTIVATION, in spite of the psi of living there is a counterbalancing joy in living that makes it worth while. Motivated people to STRIVE to find safety, security, excitement, and accomplishment in an often difficult and hostile world. They maintain their motivation because of the capacity human beings have for with PASSION. With maturity passion becomes focused into psychological and spiritual practices that help people find peace, serenity, and security without the constant need to strive, perform, and produce.

Many people find that a state of euphoria induced by the addictive use of alcohol and other drugs can give them short term relief from the angst of life. Unfortunately, people who experience this addictive brain response are at high risk of developing addiction. The addictive release leads to obsession I have intrusive thoughts about how good the euphoric response felt. I feel a COMPULSION to repeat the experience.

As the compulsion becomes stronger it turns into CRAVING which turns wanting the addictive release into the need for the addictive release. This creates a self reinforcing pattern of addictive use which is called ADDICTION, which is marked a compulsive pattern of DRUG SEEKING BEHAVIOR.

Over time, the cycle can be described as a EUPHORIC RESPONSE to addictive use, a DYSPHORIC RESPONSE to abstinence, a CRAVING or perceived need to use, DEPENDENCE or being unable to function normally without addictive use, and TOLERANCE the need to use more in order to get the same level of euphoria.

Once the ADDICTION CYCLE BEGINS, addictive THOUGHTS, FEELINGS, URGES, and ACTIONS become engrained in automatic and unconscious habits. These habits attract people who support the addictive way of life or are willing to become committed to enabling it.

These Social and Cultural Reactions to addiction create a permissive environment for early stage addiction when addictive use makes people feel good and be more productive and stigma reaction when people lose control and begin stepping outside of social, cultural and legal limits.

This is all part of the addiction, which is a health crd problem that is best dealt with using a Public health Addiction Policy:

(1) TOXIC SUBSTANCE: Identifying the toxic substances causing the illness;

(2) VULNERABLE HOST: Identifying the people who are predisposed to addiction); and

(3) PERMISSIVE ENVIRONMENT: Changing the societal and cultural norms that make ready access to and heavy regular use of the toxic substances and behaviors socially, culturally, and personally unacceptable.

Gorski Books: http://www.relapse.org

Gorski Training: http://www.cenaps.com 

Gorski On Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/gorskirecovery

LIVE SOBER – BE RESPONSIBLE – LIVE FREE

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THE DEFINITION OF RELAPSE 

May 10, 2015

By Terence T. Gorski

Here are the key points of the definition of relapse from a wide variety of internet dictionaries :

To experience a relapse means:

1. The return of a disease or illness after partial or full recovery from i

2. To suffer a deterioration in a disease after a period of improvement.

3. To fall back into illness after convalescence or apparent recovery

4. To have a deterioration in health after a temporary improvement.

5. To fall or slide back into a former state of illness or dysfunction.

6. To regress after partial recovery from illness.

7. To slip back into bad habits or self-defeating ways of living; to backslide after a period of progress.

8. To fall back into a former state, especially after apparent improvement.

Origin of the word RELAPSE: the word relapse comes from the Middle English word “relapsen,” and from Latin meaning to to “forswear” (to promise or swear in advance that a change will be made.   A combination of the words: relb or relps-, came to mean to fall back gradually; or to slide back without being able to stop ones self (as could happen when trying to move up a slippery or muddy hill.

The word relapse results from a linguistic process called “nominalization” which means to describe a process (like loving someone or relating to someone) into a thing (like love or relationship).

It is important to do a “cross-walk” between 12-Step language (i.e. dry drunk leading to a wet drunk) and the language of cognitive behavioral therapy (the process of falling back into an illness, condition, or habitual problem behaviors that ends in the act of drinking, drugging, or acting out an addiction or habitual self-defeating behavior.

Using an “addictive release” provided by an addictive drug or behavior is often seen as the start of a “relapse episode,” a single discreet episode of addictive use.

A relapse episode is usually preceded by stressful events (triggers), that raise stress and activate old self-defeating and addictive ways of thinking, feeling, acting, and relating to other people.

Marlatt distinguished between a lapse (a short term and low consequence episode of addictive use) and a relapse (a return to a previous state of out-of-control addictive acting out usually accompanied by a return of secondary problems related to the addiction.

I believe in a Twelve-Step Plus Approach that matches the needs of individual recovering people with a strong recommendation to attend 12-Strep Programs and to participate in other treatment activities (professionally supervised) and recovery activities (peer supported and community based) that meet individual needs, promotes long-term recovery, and uses appropriate relapse prevention methods. There is no wrong door into recovery. There is no wrong treatment or recovery activity if it helps people to live a sober and responsible life filled with meaning and purpose.

Language Programs The Brain,
Focuses The Mind, and
Motivates Behavior.

Think clearly to get results in recovery!

~ Terry Gorski Blog: www.terrygorski.com

~ Terry Gorski, via www.facebook.com/GorskiRecovery

www.relapse.org

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Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention

March 11, 2015

  1. The integration of mindful awareness (mindfulness) is being used and integrated with Relapse Prevention Therapy (RPT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy for changing addictive behaviors related to addiction, a wide variety of compulsive behavios, and the change of self-defeating habitual behaviors. The article below is an excellent description of Minfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MPRP). This article is reposted from the Website: http://www.mindfulrp.com/default.html I strongly recommend this website for addition information on MPRP. 
~ Terence T. Gorski (Gorski’s Books on Relapse Prevention: http://www.relapse.org 

MBRP (Bowen, Chawla and Marlatt, 2010) is a novel treatment approach developed at theAddictive Behaviors Research Center at the University of Washington, for individuals in recovery from addictive behaviors. 

The program is designed to bring practices of mindful awareness to individuals who have suffered from the addictive trappings and tendencies of the mind. MBRP practices are intended to foster increased awareness of triggers, destructive habitual patterns, and “automatic” reactions that seem to control many of our lives. The mindfulness practices in MBRP are designed to help us pause, observe present experience, and bring awareness to the range of choices before each of us in every moment.  We learn to respond in ways that serves us, rather than react in ways that are detrimental to our health and happiness. Ultimately, we are working towards freedom from deeply ingrained and often catastrophic habits.

Similar to Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for depression, MBRP is designed as an aftercare program integrating mindfulness practices and principles with cognitive-behavioral relapse prevention. In our experience, MBRP is best suited to individuals who have undergone initial treatment and wish to maintain their treatment gains and develop a lifestyle that supports their well-being and recovery.

The primary goals of MBRP are: 

1. Develop awareness of personal triggers and habitual reactions, and learn ways to create a pause in this seemingly automatic process. 

2. Change our relationship to discomfort, learning to recognize challenging emotional and physical experiences and responding to them in skillful ways. 

3. Foster a nonjudgmental, compassionate approach toward ourselves and our experiences. 

4. Build a lifestyle that supports both mindfulness practice and recovery.  



This website and these resources are maintained by gifted funds. Any contributions are greatly appreciated!  Your generosity allows us to continue to offer many of our services at no cost.  (Please note: since we do not have nonprofit status, gifts are not tax deductible.)

Understanding the Terrorist Radicalization Process

February 18, 2015

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This is directly reposted from the Department of Defense (DOD) – Defense Human Resource Activity: http://www.dhra.mil/perserec/osg/terrorism/radicalization.htm I decided to post this blog on the radicalization process because the problem of terrorism appears to be growing and we all need accurate information about how people are recruited to a terrorist cause and the steps taken to motivate them to reject previous belief systems and to embrace new, radical, and often deadly beliefs, even when, on their face, they are absurd and irrational.

We must all understand the raprocess so we can recognize it early and stop the process before the radicalized individual does horrible damage.


The basic message we need to give is clear: the promises of radicalization are false and will lead to horrible inner pain and eventually death. ~ Terence T. Gorski 

Here is the DHRA Report: The Radicalization Process

There has been much research, writing, and theorizing about what causes or motivates people to become terrorists. The one consistent finding based on extensive empirical research is that there is no “terrorist profile” that can be used to predict who or even what type of person might become a terrorist.

Research clearly rules out the early theory that participation in terrorist actions is associated with some sort of personality or mental disorder, that only “crazy” people commit horrible acts of terrorism. Studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness among incarcerated terrorists is as low or lower than in the general population. Although terrorists commit horrible acts, they rarely match the profile of the classic psychopath. They are also not necessarily from a lower socioeconomic status or less educated than their peers.1

Social scientists, law enforcement organizations, and intelligence agencies all agree that terrorists are the product of a dynamic process called radicalization.

Brian Jenkins, one of our country’s most senior terrorism scholars, defines radicalization as “the process of adopting for oneself or inculcating in others a commitment not only to a system of [radical] beliefs, but to their imposition on the rest of society.”2 The compulsion to use violence to impose their beliefs on the rest of society, or to punish others for their “evil” actions or beliefs is the final stage in the radicalization process.

The commitment to violence is what distinguishes a terrorist from other extremists. This process occurs over time and causes a fundamental change in how people view themselves and the world in which they live. The exact nature of this process is still poorly understood. Researchers have developed a number of different theories and conceptual models that seek to explain the process by which an individual becomes radicalized, but these theories have not been empirically tested.

Most see three to five stages from beginning to end of the process, from initial exposure through indoctrination, training, and then violent action. However, different researchers conceptualize these stages differently and use different terminology to identify or explain them.

There is broad agreement, however, that many people who begin this process do not pass through all the stages and become terrorists. Many people who become extremists stop short of the violence that is typical of militant jihadists.

Our focus here is on violent jihadism, and specifically on several aspects of the radicalization process about which there seems to be some consensus. While the researchers have not identified causes of terrorism, they have identified three vulnerabilities that may provide sources of motivation or make one more likely to endorse violence. These vulnerabilities are:

1. Perceived Injustice or Humiliation: Violent attack may be perceived as an appropriate remedy for injustice or humiliation.

2. Need for Identity: An individual’s search for identity may draw him or her to extremist or terrorist organizations in a variety of ways. The individual may be searching for a purpose or goal in life that defines the actions required to achieve that goal. A violent act may be seen as a way to succeed at something that makes a difference. The absolutist, “black and white” nature of most extremist ideologies is often attractive to those who feel overwhelmed by the complexity and stress of navigating a complicated world. Without struggling to define oneself or discern personal meaning, an individual may choose to define his or her identity simply through identification with a cause or membership in a group.

3. Need for Belonging: Many prospective terrorists find in a radical extremist group not only a sense of meaning, but also a sense of belonging, connectedness, and affiliation. One researcher argues that “for the individuals who become active terrorists, the initial attraction is often to the group, or community of believers, rather than to an abstract ideology or to violence.” 3

There is also some consensus on two factors that facilitated the radicalization process.. These are:

1. Spiritual Mentor: About 20% of the homegrown terrorists examined in one study had a spiritual mentor, a more experienced Muslim who gave specific instructions and direction during the radicalization process. Such a mentor might be associated with a mosque or be accessed via the Internet. The mentor keeps the radicalization process on track. About a quarter of the terrorists in one study had a perceived religious authority who provided specific theological approval for their violent activity. 4

2. Internet: The increased radicalization of American Muslims is driven in part by a wave of English-language websites designed to promote the militant jihadist doctrine. These websites are not run or directed by al-Qaida, but they provide a powerful tool for recruiting sympathizers to its cause of jihad, or holy war against the United States, according to experts who track this activity. Jihadist websites and chat rooms provide indoctrination and training to aspiring jihadists and enable them to establish contact with like-minded individuals in the United States or with terrorist groups abroad. “The number of [active] English-language sites sympathetic to al-Qaida has risen from about 30 seven years ago to more than 200 recently,” according to the head of a Saudi government program that works to combat militant Islamic websites.5

Terrorism is not random violence for its own sake. It is violence guided by an ideology that provides the rules for one’s behavior. “Ideology is often defined as a common and broadly agreed upon set of rules to which an individual subscribes, and which help to regulate and determine behavior.”6 The rules often link behaviors to anticipated long-term positive outcomes and rewards. This is the basis for the suicide attacks that are characteristic of violent jihad. By fulfilling one’s duty to God by killing infidels, one allegedly gains access to paradise.

The ideology that supports militant jihad is very different in its substance from other forms of extremism or terrorism such as white supremacy groups or eco-terrorism, but they all have four features in common. All terrorist movements are: 5

1. Polarized: They have an “us vs. them” mindset.

2. Absolutist: The beliefs are regarded as truth in the absolute sense, sometimes supported by sacred authority. This squelches questioning, critical thinking, and dissent. It also adds moral authority to framing us vs. them as a competition between good and bad (or evil).

3. Threat-Oriented: External threat causes in-groups to cohere. Good leaders know this intuitively. They persistently remind adherents that the “us” is at risk from “them.” Because the “us” is seen as being good and right in the absolute sense, this works not only to promote internal cohesion but also opposition to all nonbelievers.

4. Hateful: Hate energizes violent action. It allows principled opposition to impel direct action. It also facilitates various mechanisms for moral disengagement, or dehumanization, which erode the normal social and psychological barriers to engaging in violence. This is an important point, as it is the active support for violence that distinguishes the simple extremist from the terrorist.

The section on The Militant Jihadist Terrorism Threat describes the threat. One empirical study of 117 homegrown jihadist terrorists in America and the United Kingdom has identified the following observable manifestations of the radicalization process. This may be useful for identifying how far along individuals are in the radicalization process. 4

At an early stage, one comes to trust only the interpretations of an ideologically rigid set of religious authorities. These role models and scholars one looks to as guides have a significant impact on how others interpret what their faith demands of them.

Also at an early stage, one adopts a legalistic interpretation of the Muslim faith. There are rules that must be followed, not just for practice of the faith, but also for virtually every aspect of one’s daily life. For example, playing music, taking photographs, or women laughing in the street may be considered sinful.

At the final stage of radicalization, these rules include an obligation for all believers to undertake violence against infidels in order to advance the faith.

As they radicalize, Muslims come to perceive a fundamental conflict between Islam and the West. The idea of loyalty becomes critical: they have obligations to Islam alone and cannot have any kind of duty or loyalty to a non-Muslim state. Even participation in the democratic process in one’s own country violates religious principles that the rules are made by Allah, not by man.

This rigid interpretation of Islam leads to a low tolerance for any alternative interpretations or practices. After changing one’s own beliefs and practices, one feels compelled to impose the newly found beliefs on other family members and close friends. Any deviation by others from this rigid interpretation is seen as a personal affront. This is usually expressed by telling others that they are not good Muslims, which can sometimes lead to violence. It causes some individuals to separate themselves from and come to hate other Muslims who previously had been an important part of their lives.

In the latter stages, radicalization usually includes political as well as religious beliefs. Radicals believe the Western powers have conspired against Islam to subjugate it politically and corrupt it morally. They want to restore the caliphate that once united the Muslim world and ruled according to Allah’s dictates.

Remember that in the United States, expression of radical or extremist views is not illegal. It is illegal only when it reaches an advanced stage of supporting or engaging in an act of violence or other illegal behavior. For an individual who holds a U.S. Government security clearance or some other position of public trust, however, a stricter standard of allegiance to the United States applies. Advocacy of militant jihadist views as described in The Militant Jihadist Terrorism Threat is clear evidence of an absence of loyalty to the United States and is grounds for denial or revocation of a security clearance or access to other sensitive information or installations.

References
1. Randy Borum, “Understanding Terrorist Psychology,” in Andrew Silke, ed. The Psychology of Counter-Terrorism. Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2010.
2. Brian Michael Jenkins, “Outside Experts View,” preface to Daveed Gartenstein-Ross & Laura Grossman, Homegrown Terrorists in the U.S. and U.K.: An Empirical Examination of the Radicalization Process. Washington, DC: FDD’s Center for Terrorism Research, 2009.
3. Martha Crenshaw, “The Subjective Reality of the Terrorist: Ideological and Psychological Factors in Terrorism,” in Robert O. Slater & Michael Stohl, eds., Current Perspectives in International Terrorism. Hampshire, UK: Macmillan, 1988, p. 59.
4. Daveed Gartenstein-Ross & Laura Grossman, Homegrown Terrorists in the U.S. and U.K.: An Empirical Examination of the Radicalization Process. Washington, DC: FDD’s Center for Terrorism Research, 2009.
5. Randy Borum, ibid., p. 9.
6. Randy Borum, ibid., pp. 10-11.
7. Donna Abu-Nasr & Lee Keath, “200 Web sites spread al-Qaida’s message in English, The Washington Post, November 20, 2009.


God and the Sunrise

February 15, 2015

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By Terence T. Gorski, Author

Once, in the early morning just before sunrise, I was standing with a student waiting for the sun to come up. I was teaching a class on relapse prevention at a conference center in Arizona. I got up early to watch the sunrise. A young man, one of my students, walked up next to me. We both gazed toward the east waiting for the sun to come up

“Do you believe in God?”  the student suddenly asked.

The question surprised me. Before I could answer,  the first rays of the sunrise broke over the eastern horizon – pushing away the darkness of night and blanketing the sand-colored rock with an incredible mist of swirling colors.

I looked at the young man and for a moment. Then I turned back to watch the brilliantly colored rays role gently role toward us. They seemed, at first, to be boiling above the hot desert sand. As the sun rose higher in the sky, the multicolored mist turned into a blazing ball of silver and gold. it was so bright we had to squint our eyes and look away.

“Well – Do you believe in God?” The boy asked again. I had forgotten he had asked the question. His voice was so insistent and his face was so serious that I knew I had to answer

“Yes,” I Said. “I believe in God. There is certainly someone or something bigger and more powerful than me – Someone who capable making much better sunrises than I ever could. I believe in God very strongly when I watch his powerful works unfold all around me.” The boy seemed satisfied with my answer.

We gave one last glance at the rising sun. We turned and walked back into the conference room. Even though the rising sun was incredibly beautiful, there was no time to waste. We were learning about how to help addicts and their families recovery. As we settled in and I began the class, I could feel the presence of God in the room and I realized that the work we were doing in the classroom was just as powerful and awe-inspiring as the sunrise we had just experienced

The Books of Terence T. Gorski


Lying and Second Chances

January 18, 2015

2015/01/img_0913.jpg
By Terence T. Gorski
Author (The Books of Terence T. Gorski)

“For every good reason there is to lie, there is a better reason to tell the truth.” ~ Bo Bennett

When you catch someone telling a lie, should you give him or her a second chance? Or should you follow the advice of William Shakespeare: “Trust not him that hath once broken faith.”

This question, when approached thoughtfully, is more difficult to answer than it first appears.

When I ask people whether they should give a second chance to someone who tells them a lie, the answers I get range from “absolutely yes” to “absolutely no.”

Other people have developed rules for when to give a second chance and when to cut their losses by getting the person out of their life, or at least out of their box of sensitive secrets.

The answer to the question of what to do when you discover they are lying depends upon how we define the idea of telling lies and telling the truth. So let’s ask the tough questions that are not as easy to answer as they may seem.

What is a lie?

Here’s the dictionary definition: “a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood.
Synonyms include prevarication and falsification. Antonyms include truth.

What is the truth?

The dictionary tells us that it is “the true actual state of a matter. That which is really happening or going on. Conformity with the facts or reality.” The the concept of the truth is further clarified as: “the real facts about something: the things that are true: the quality or state of being true: a statement or idea that is true or accepted as true; A statement that is supported by evidence.”

Wow! These are really circular definitions that essentially tell us “the truth is what is true!”

These definitions of truth beg a very important issue: the truth is rarely absolute and is usually relative to what is accepted as truth at the time and the “truth as we see it from our point of view.”

Most of the time to “tell the truth” means to “explain our best understanding given our point of view, the extent of our knowledge, and the currently best known and most widely accepted evidence.”

Honesty and lying are as much about the intent to deceive as it is about giving mistaken information.

If you make an honest mistake in solving a mathematical problem, it is usually not considered a lie. It is a mistake or unintentional error. It might be a lie if you deliberately falsify the answers for some secondary gain.

So, in my opinion, it would make sense to make the distinction between an honest mistake (I believe that what I am saying to be factual or true) and a lie (I know what is true and deliberately try to tell you something else).

I find that most people who tell one lie (i.e tell others that something is true when they know that it is not), tend to tell other lies as well. They use lies as an habitual tool to gain things of value in life or to deny some painful truths.

Sometimes the habitual liar can convince themselves that a lie is actually true. This can be a useful skill if you have to pass a lie detector test. Some people are skilled at catching people who are telling lies. This can be a useful skill to recognize and avoid getting hurt by con men and habitual liars.

Most actively addicted people tell lies about their alcohol and other drug use. They minimize how much they use and try to cover up the damage caused by their use.

Some addicts don’t actually lie, they just block out some aspects of reality so they are intentionally ignorant. This is called being sincerely deluded.

Must alcoholics, for example, never count the number of drinks they have or add up how much money they are spending on alcohol or drugs. They keep themselves willfully or intentionally ignorant in order to avoid facing the truth.

The truth is a continually evolving thing based upon our best understanding at the time. All we can really tell someone is our best understanding of the truth as Wevsee it at the current time and then explain why we believe it to be true (i.e. Present the evidence we have that makes us believe that it is true).

In the everyday world we operate on a common-sense definition of truth.

– I did or did not do this!
– I was or was not at a certain place at a specific time!
– This is what has happened in the past !
– This is what is happening now!
– This is what I believe will happen in the future!

Anyone who tells you they know exactly what will happen in the future is guessing or is sincerely deluded. No one can be certain about the future.

Many people have beliefs without evidence. They accept things are true without any real proof. Every culture teaches thousands of truths, both little and big, that people are supposed to accept as true.

So what should you do if you believe someone is lying to you?

The first step is to ask the question again and make sure you are understanding their answer. Many accusations of telling a lie are based in poor communication and misunderstanding.

Tell the other person very clearly that you don’t believe it is true and present your evidence. Tell them you are open to reconsider if they have better evidence. This gives the people their day in court. They get to describe the “truth as they see it from their point of view.”

Before jumping to conclusions it is helpful to detach, back up, observe, and investigate. The serious problem is not a single lie told in isolation to deal with a specific situation. The most serious problem is the person who uses deceit and dishonesty as a habitual way to cope with life.

If there is a pattern of lying, it is foolish to trust. Many people are habitual liars. In other words they are in the habit of twisting the truth to get what they want.

Trust must be earned. It must be built little by little, one step at a time. When building a relationship, it is best to self-disclose a little bit at a time. If the person responds by self-disclosing at the same level to you, go back a try again. If they continue self-disclose at the level that you are they are, they are probable trustworthy. If they don’t reciprocate, be wary and ask yourself if they are trying to hide something or to get you at a disadvantage by knowing more about you than you know about them.

If what you told them in confidence ends up on the grapevine, run the other way. People who gossip and tell you the secrets of others that were told to them in confidence will almost certainly do the same to you.

Recovery demands a policy of rigorous honesty this means:

– The willingness to look honestly at yourself and your past behavior;
– The intent to be honest by reporting the truth as you believe it to be while acknowledging that “I might be wrong.”
– To promptly admit mistakes and be willing to correct them;
– To look with a critical eye at what you believe and the evidence you have to support that belief; and
– To be willing to act in faith upon your best understanding of the truth until you find new and more compelling evidence that causes you to change your mind.

Rigorous honesty is a skill that needs to be learned and practiced. This is because, as fallible human beings we are prone to lie to ourselves and it others. It is also because the truth is hard to find.

LIVE SOBER – BE RESPONSIBLE -LIVE FREE

Don’t miss Terry Gorski’s books and workbooks on recognizing and managing denial.

Denial Management Counseling (DMC)

The Books of Terence T. Gorski


Terrorism

January 18, 2015

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By Terence T. Gorski
Author, The Books of Terence T. Gorski

Life is full of danger and terror. Wherever we look we find the prospect of gloom. That said, let’s get on with living. 
REFLECTIONS ON 9-11:
I remember the terror attacks of 9-11. I was a part of that history, as were many of you. I honor the memory of all the people lost on that tragic day and in all the battles that followed.

We are now into year eleven of the war on terror.
– Justified? Of course!
– Necessary? Yes, in the judgment of many people more knowledgable than I!
– Courageously fought by our nation’s warriors? Most definitely! — Righteous violence? As righteous as violence can ever be!

Is the war on terror a part of a never ending historical cycle of war and violence? Most definitely!

It might just be me — but I pray that we, all humanity, find a way to peace.

“If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.” ~ Thomas Paine

The Books of Terence T. Gorski


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