Spin – The Art of Political Lying

July 20, 2016


By Terence T. Gorski

Here is how Wilipedia defines and describes SPIN: 

Spin is propaganda or presenting lies to the public as the truth. The term, “plausible deniability” actual means to protect politicians from the consequences of getting caught in a lie. 

In public relations, Spin is a form of propaganda, achieved through providing a biased interpretation of an event or campaigning to persuade public opinion in favor or against some organization or public figure. 

While traditional public relations may also rely on creative presentation of the facts, “spin” often implies the use of disingenuous, deceptive, and highly manipulative tactics.[1]

Politicians are often accused by their opponents of claiming to be truthful and seek the truth while using spin tactics to manipulate public opinion. Large corporations with sophisticated public relations branches also engage in “spinning” information or events in their favor. 

Because of the frequent association between spin and press conferences (especially government press conferences), the room in which these take place is sometimes described as a spin room.

Public relations advisors, pollsters and media consultants who develop spin may be referred to as “spin doctors” or “spinmeisters” who manipulate the truth and create a biased interpretation of events for the person or group that hired them.
The term has its origin in the old American expression “to spin a yarn”. 

Sailors were known for using their spare time on board making thread or string (yarn) and also for telling incredible tales when they were on shore. 

When someone fooled you, it was said that “he spun me an amazing yarn”. Yarn also became a synonym for “tall tale” – “What a yarn!”, means “what a lie”. 

A coarser and more contemporary version of this expression is “bullshit”, and, for anyone who seeks to deceive, “bullshit artist”. 
History of Spin

Edward Bernays has been called the “Father of Public Relations”. As Larry Tye describes in his book The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations, Bernays was able to help tobacco and alcohol companies use techniques to make certain behaviors more socially acceptable in the 20th-century United States. Tye claims that Bernays was proud of his work as a propagandist. 

As information technology has increased dramatically since the end of the 20th century, commentators like Joe Trippi have advanced the theory that modern Internet activism spells the end for political spin. By providing immediate counterpoint to every point a “spin doctor” can come up with, this theory suggests, the omnipresence of the Internet in some societies will inevitably lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of spin.[4]
The techniques of spin include:
Selectively presenting facts and quotes that support one’s position (cherry picking). For example, a pharmaceutical company could pick and choose trials where their product shows a positive effect, ignoring the unsuccessful trials, or a politician’s staff could handpick speech quotations from past years which appear to show her support for a certain position)

  • Non-denial denial
  • Non-apology apology
  • Politically-correct deception
  • Making misinformation (deliberate lies) seem like the truth 

“Mistakes were made” is an expression that is commonly used as a rhetorical device, whereby a speaker acknowledges that a situation was managed by using low-quality or inappropriate handling but seeks to evade any direct admission or accusation of responsibility by not specifying the person who made the mistakes. The acknowledgement of “mistakes” is framed in an abstract sense, with no direct reference to who made the mistakes and what exactly the mistakes were. The ultimate mistake, of course, is to get caught in the lie. 

A less evasive construction might be along the lines of “I made mistakes” or “John Doe made mistakes.” The speaker neither accepts personal responsibility nor accuses anyone else. The word “mistakes” also does not imply intent.
Phrasing in a way that assumes unproven truths, or avoiding the question[5]

“Burying bad news”: announcing unpopular things at a time when it is believed that the media will focus on other news. In some cases, governments have released potentially controversial reports on summer long weekends, to avoid significant news coverage. Sometimes that other news is supplied by deliberately announcing popular items at the same time.

Spin includes the art of misdirection and diversion[6]

For years businesses have used fake or misleading customer testimonials by editing/spinning customers to reflect a much more satisfied experience than was actually the case. In 2009 the Federal Trade Commission updated their laws to include measures to prohibit this type of “spinning” and have been enforcing these laws as of late. 

Additionally, over the past 5 to 6 years several companies have arisen that verify the authenticity of the testimonials businesses present on the marketing materials in an effort to convince one to become a customer.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spin_(propaganda) 

GORSKI BOOKS: www.relapse.org


What Makes Us Stronger

July 7, 2016


By Terence T. Gorski

What Makes Us Stronger? Why is that question important?
The German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche believed this simple principle:

“That which does not kill us, makes us stronger.”

The principle is correct on many levels. It eloquently states Nietzsche’s “superman hypothesis” which proposed that it is best for people to be determined, strong and merciless so that human empathy and compassion did not interfere with people living their lives or supporting their collective causes.

This philosophy of Nietzsche was embraced by Hitler and integrated at the core of the education and training to be a NAZIS.

I believe that ideas have powerful personal and collective consequences. Either for good or evil. The more eloquently and memorably an idea is crafted the more effective it is. Ideologies that are brief, easy to remember and repeat to others are most effective. These brief compelling descriptions of ideologies take on a life of their own as they spread from mind to mind.

I try to be careful about the ideologies I embrace and promote because I realize a well-crafted idea is more powerful than a loaded gun.

Like a virus, once an idea or ideology is released to other minds it spreads and is very difficult to stop.

GORSKI-BOOKS: www.relapse.org


GORSKI ADDICTION MODEL

April 26, 2016

  The Gorski Comprehensive Addiction Model is a a science-based system that incorporates both chemical and behavioral addictions in a comprehensive biopsychosocial perspective. 

THE HUMAN CONDITION: The Gorski Model builds upon a recognition that all addiction is based within the human condition. The human condition is organized and directed by the CORE HUMAN PROCESSES OF PERSONALITY

DEVELOPMENT. The human process begins with an intangible but self-evident primal life force which motivates human beings to survive and thrive in the physical world. The frustration resulting from the collision of the infinite potential of the human spirit with the finite limitation of the physical world results in ANGST, the normal pain of life and living. ANGST is managed by people in one of three ways: DENIAL, it doesn’t exist – everything is beautiful;

DEMORALIZATION, since life hurts I will just give up and stop trying; or MOTIVATION, in spite of the psi of living there is a counterbalancing joy in living that makes it worth while. Motivated people to STRIVE to find safety, security, excitement, and accomplishment in an often difficult and hostile world. They maintain their motivation because of the capacity human beings have for with PASSION. With maturity passion becomes focused into psychological and spiritual practices that help people find peace, serenity, and security without the constant need to strive, perform, and produce.

Many people find that a state of euphoria induced by the addictive use of alcohol and other drugs can give them short term relief from the angst of life. Unfortunately, people who experience this addictive brain response are at high risk of developing addiction. The addictive release leads to obsession I have intrusive thoughts about how good the euphoric response felt. I feel a COMPULSION to repeat the experience.

As the compulsion becomes stronger it turns into CRAVING which turns wanting the addictive release into the need for the addictive release. This creates a self reinforcing pattern of addictive use which is called ADDICTION, which is marked a compulsive pattern of DRUG SEEKING BEHAVIOR.

Over time, the cycle can be described as a EUPHORIC RESPONSE to addictive use, a DYSPHORIC RESPONSE to abstinence, a CRAVING or perceived need to use, DEPENDENCE or being unable to function normally without addictive use, and TOLERANCE the need to use more in order to get the same level of euphoria.

Once the ADDICTION CYCLE BEGINS, addictive THOUGHTS, FEELINGS, URGES, and ACTIONS become engrained in automatic and unconscious habits. These habits attract people who support the addictive way of life or are willing to become committed to enabling it.

These Social and Cultural Reactions to addiction create a permissive environment for early stage addiction when addictive use makes people feel good and be more productive and stigma reaction when people lose control and begin stepping outside of social, cultural and legal limits.

This is all part of the addiction, which is a health crd problem that is best dealt with using a Public health Addiction Policy:

(1) TOXIC SUBSTANCE: Identifying the toxic substances causing the illness;

(2) VULNERABLE HOST: Identifying the people who are predisposed to addiction); and

(3) PERMISSIVE ENVIRONMENT: Changing the societal and cultural norms that make ready access to and heavy regular use of the toxic substances and behaviors socially, culturally, and personally unacceptable.

Gorski Books: http://www.relapse.org

Gorski Training: http://www.cenaps.com 

Gorski On Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/gorskirecovery

LIVE SOBER – BE RESPONSIBLE – LIVE FREE

– Permission is granted to repost or distribute this graphic and article. –


Thought Terminating Cliches

October 3, 2015

by Terence T. Gorski

No Need To Think!

A thought terminating cliché is something that we memorize and start to use automatically that keeps us from thinking clearly and deeply about something. For example: “Screw it, I don’t need this now!” 

The key to identifying a thought terminating cliché is to recognize that we don’t really understand what the thought means and it turns off our thought process when we are confronting a problem that we really need to think through. As a result we become trapped using this thought terminating clichés to shut down our mind whenever we start thinking about something that makes us feel uncomfortable but that we need to confront in order to grow in our recovery.

We need tp recognize the difference between thought terminating clichés that stop us from thinking about issues we need to face, and healthy thought stopping commands that we use to turn off habitual irrational thinking, ruminations, and resentments.

In my definition of a thought stopping cliché presented above, it says very clearly tat it is: “something that we memorize and start to use automatically that keeps us from thinking clearly and deeply about something.” This is very different from thought redirecting phrases that have a deep personal meaning and change our way of thinking from old addictive thought patterns to new recovery supportive ways of thinking.

The slogans in 12-Step programs are a perfect example of thought redirecting phrases if they are used properly. And this is a big if! 

It is both “what we say to ourselves” and “how we have conditioned our brain / mind to respond to what we say to ourselves.” Let me explain. 

If our response to the slogan “Easy does it!” activates the belief “It’s OK to do nothing at all if I don’t feel like it!” the slogan is being used a a thought terminating cliche – a form of thinking without thought that gives us permission to only do what we feel like doing and not what we need to do to recover.  

If the same slogan “Easy does it!” helps us to start thinking about: 

• The need to slow down and lower stress;

• The importance of not biting off more than we can chew to avoid choking (Father Joe Martin’s concept of “not feeding spiritual steak to spiritual infants); 

• The real danger of running down as hill as fast as you can because it feels good in the moment while ignoring the long term consequence of falling flat on our face as gravity and momentum compel us to run faster than out legs can carry us; 

• Don’t take on so much that it takes us away from our recovery program and distracts us with other things we believe we must do now;; 

• We are not what we do! We are who we are as sober human beings. We are good people and it is OK to “just be and grow” in response toour spiritual voice within that tells us sobriety is necessary for us to stay alive and grow so staying sober need to come first.

If the phase Easy does It helps is to stop obsessively thinking addictive compulsive thoughts by telling ourselves to “do more and more and do it now or else” it gives us permission to slow down, turn off the mental chatter, practice patience, and just be.”

The question that determines the difference between thought stopping and thought redirecting is:

• “Does the memorized phrase stop me from thinking and reflecting on important issues that I need to face to move on in my recovery?. or

• Does the memorized phrase give me permission and motivational to go on doing self-defeating things that can lead to relapse? 

If the memorized word or phrase reminds me to stop and think about the new principles of recovery and personal responsibility it is a positive thought redirecting phrase because by thinking about it I am learning and growing in my recovery program.

If the memorized word or phrase keeps me locked into a pattern of addictive, compulsive and self-defeating ways of thinking it is a negative thought stopping cliché.

The difference between the two can be subtle and difficult to judge in the moment. This is why discussing our thinking with our sponsor, fellow members of our program, and at meetings is so important. These conversations about how to evaluate what we are thinking should, in the best tradition of recovery, teach us to think more clearly and rationally about addiction oriented versus recovery oriented thinking and behavior. This distinction is difficult to understand and even more difficult to explain (I feel I have not done the concept justice here and will keep working on an explanation that is more clear and easy to understand). It is a distinction, however, that is critically important to make in our own minds so we can learn how to manage our mental and emotional life in recovery. 

I will end with the words of one of my favorite singers and song writers, Harry Chapin, when he says in one of his songs: “Sometimes words can serve me well and sometimes words can go to hell!”

To Start Using Thought Redirecting Phrases In The Workbook

The Cognitive Restructuring for Addiction: http://www.relapse.org/custom/cart/edit.asp?p=92050 

Gorski Books: http://www.relapse.org

Gorski Home Studies: http://www.cenaps.com 


THE RELAPSE PREVENTION CERTIFICATION SCHOOL (RPCS) – 2015

August 8, 2015

Earn 44 CEUs, In 5 Days, for $695!
  Instructed By: Terence T. Gorski and Dr. Stephen F. Grinstead

November 9-14, 2015

Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Terence T. Gorski’s advanced relapse prevention training has been “a turning point” in both the professional and personal lives of many former participants. The Gorski schools began in 1982 in Chicago, IL. Since that time, over sixty schools have been conducted with over 4,000 people completing the training.

This advanced clinical skills training experience is designed for professional therapists who are good and want to get better. It may be the most challenging and effective training that you have ever attended.

Upon completion of this training, participants will be able to develop comprehensive Relapse Prevention Plans for identifying and managing both high risk situations in early recovery and the core personality and lifestyle problems that lead to relapse in later recovery, after initial stabilization.

The Gorski Relapse Prevention Certification School (RPCS) is continuously updated with the latest research and uses a proven training method that includes:

(1) Brief Lectures that explain the purpose of each technique and why it is important;

(2) Clinical Demonstrations of each RP technique,

(3) Role Play to practice and receive feedback on your use of each technique,

(4) Small Groups to discuss progress, problems, and applications to your personal style;

(5) Discussions of how to apply the techniques in your professional setting.

Do you want to take your current clinical skills and integrate them with new and powerful approaches for identifying and managing the high-risk situations and core personality and life-style patterns that lead to relapse? If you do, this is the training for you!

Important Notice: An optional RPT Competency Certification that requires the completion of a competency portfolio and an additional fee.

Training Fee: The cost of the training is $695 for the five-day training experience (travel, meals, and lodging are not included in this fee).

Florida Location: HYATT REGENCY PIER SIXTY SIX, 2301 SE 17th Street Causeway Fort Lauderdale FL 33316 USA Telephone: 1-954-525-6666 on November 10-14, 2014 (Special hotel rates will be available for those who register early!

For information and Registration:
Tresa Watson at 1-352-596-8000 or tresa@cenaps.com

Website: www.cenaps.com


Thank God for the Atom Bomb

August 7, 2015

 Nuclear Weapons: A Time-Lapse History 

By Terence T. Gorski 

All people with a conscience have mixed feelings about war and the weapons of mass destruction used in modern day warfare. 

The fear of nuclear war is once again raising its head. Many of us would prefer to ignore the issue and pretend “it can never happen again.” The current deal with Iran over nuclear weapon development and the possibility of widespread nuclear proliferatio in the Middle East is raising the issue and the fear of the real possibility of nuclear war. 

People without a conscience (i.e. psychopaths/sociopaths) are not hobbled in their decision making about nuclear weapons by issues of morality, empathy, and fighting for the good. When making decisions involving the use of weapons of mass destructions psychopathic/sociopathic leaders will do anything necessary to expand their power even if it means destroying humanity in the process. 

In my opinion, the reality is that people of conscience need to come to terms with the need for violence to protect personal freedom. This means facing the issue of using violence on all levels to protect individual freedom. This includes, of course, coming to terms with the production and use of nuclear weapons. If they don’t, people motivated by high moral standards will eventually be killed, imprisoned, or controlled by psychopaths/sociopaths who are well armed and organized. This is especially true if evil intent can be cloaked by a religious ideaology. 

People of good will must recognize and name the true nature of the enemy –those who don’t are usually condemned to be defeat by the enemies they refuse to name. 

The following article was forwarded to me by Buck Yancy, a friend and mentor who keeps challenging me to face and think about the hard issues of life. It is the reprint of an essay written in 1981by the late Paul Fussell, a cultural critic and war memoirist. 

Reading this essay was unsettling. It contrasted two perspectives of making decisions about using nuclear weapons: the anstract perspective of those who make and critique policy; and the personal perspective of the troops whose lives were spared because the land invasion of Japan became unnecessary because the use of nuclear weapons forced Japan to surrender. 

Here is an article by the same name in The New Republic

Below is the original essay I received:

Thank God for the Atom Bomb  

 

Wed Aug 5, 2015 7:36 pm (PDT) . Posted by: “Jim Baker” baycur on Aug 5, 2015, at 11:42 AM, by Jeff Murray tamu73@sbcglobal.net [CHAT_281AHC] <CHAT_281AHC@yahoo groups.com> who wrote:

The headline of this column is lifted from a 1981 essay by the late Paul Fussell, the cultural critic and war memoirist. In 1945 Fussell was a 21-year-old second lieutenant in the U.S. Army who had fought his way through Europe only to learn that he would soon be shipped to the Pacific to take part in Operation Downfall, the invasion of the Japanese home islands scheduled to begin in November 1945. 

Then the atom bomb intervened. Japan would not surrender after Hiroshima, but it did after Nagasaki.

I brought Fussell’s essay with me on my flight to Hiroshima and was stopped by this: “When we learned to our astonishment that we would not be obliged in a few months to rush up the beaches near Tokyo assault-firing while being machine-gunned, mortared, and shelled, for all the practiced phlegm of our tough facades we broke down and cried with relief and joy. We were going to live.”

In all the cant that will pour forth this week to mark the 70th anniversary of the dropping of the bombs—that the U.S. owes the victims of the bombings an apology; that nuclear weapons ought to be abolished; that Hiroshima is a monument to man’s inhumanity to man; that Japan could have been defeated in a slightly nicer way—I doubt much will be made of Fussell’s fundamental point: Hiroshima and Nagasaki weren’t just terrible war-ending events. They were also lifesaving. The bomb turned the empire of the sun into a nation of peace activists.

I spent the better part of Monday afternoon with one such activist, Keiko Ogura, who runs a group called Hiroshima Interpreters for Peace. Mrs. Ogura had just turned eight when the bomb fell on Hiroshima, the epicenter less than 2 miles from her family home. She remembers wind “like a tornado”; thousands of pieces of shattered glass blasted by wind into the walls and beams of her house, looking oddly “shining and beautiful”; an oily black rain. 

And then came the refugees from the city center, appallingly burned and mutilated, “like a line of ghosts,” begging for water and then dying the moment they drank it. Everyone in Mrs. Ogura’s immediate family survived the bombing, but it would be years before any of them could talk about it. 

Because Hiroshima and Nagasaki were real events, because they happened, there can be no gainsaying their horror. Operation Downfall did not happen, so there’s a lot of gainsaying. Would the Japanese have been awed into capitulation by an offshore A-bomb test? Did the Soviet Union’s invasion of Manchuria, starting the day of the Nagasaki bombing, have the more decisive effect in pushing Japan to give up? Would casualties from an invasion really have exceeded the overall toll—by some estimates approaching 250,000—of the two bombs?

We’ll never know. 

— We only know that the U.S. lost 14,000 men merely to take Okinawa in 82 days of fighting. 
— We only know that, because Japan surrendered, the order to execute thousands of POWs in the event of an invasion of the home islands was never implemented. 

— We only know that, in the last weeks of a war Japan had supposedly already lost, the Allies were sustaining casualties at a rate of 7,000 a week. 

— We also know that the Japanese army fought nearly to the last man to defend Okinawa, and hundreds of civilians chose suicide over capture. 

Do we know for a certainty that the Japanese would have fought less ferociously to defend the main islands? We can never know for a certainty. 

“Understanding the past,” Fussell wrote, “requires pretending that you don’t know the present. It requires feeling its own pressure on your pulses without any ex post facto illumination.” Historical judgments must be made in light not only of outcomes but also of options. Would we judge Harry Truman better today if he had eschewed his nuclear option in favor of 7,000 casualties a week; that is, if he had been more considerate of the lives of the enemy than of the lives of his men?

And so the bombs were dropped, and Japan was defeated. Totally defeated. 

Modern Japan is a testament to the benefits of total defeat, to stripping a culture prone to violence of its martial pretenses. 

Modern Hiroshima is a testament to human resilience in the face of catastrophe. It is a testament, too, to an America that understood moral certainty and even a thirst for revenge were not obstacles to magnanimity. In some ways they are the precondition for it.

For too long Hiroshima has been associated with a certain brand of leftist politics, a kind of insipid pacifism salted with an implied anti-Americanism. That’s a shame. There are lessons in this city’s history that could serve us today, when the U.S. military forbids the word victory, the U.S. president doesn’t believe in the exercise of American power, and the U.S. public is consumed with guilt for sins they did not commit.

Watch the lights come on at night in Hiroshima. Note the gentleness of its culture. And thank God for the atom bomb.


Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention

March 11, 2015

  1. The integration of mindful awareness (mindfulness) is being used and integrated with Relapse Prevention Therapy (RPT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy for changing addictive behaviors related to addiction, a wide variety of compulsive behavios, and the change of self-defeating habitual behaviors. The article below is an excellent description of Minfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MPRP). This article is reposted from the Website: http://www.mindfulrp.com/default.html I strongly recommend this website for addition information on MPRP. 
~ Terence T. Gorski (Gorski’s Books on Relapse Prevention: http://www.relapse.org&nbsp;

MBRP (Bowen, Chawla and Marlatt, 2010) is a novel treatment approach developed at theAddictive Behaviors Research Center at the University of Washington, for individuals in recovery from addictive behaviors. 

The program is designed to bring practices of mindful awareness to individuals who have suffered from the addictive trappings and tendencies of the mind. MBRP practices are intended to foster increased awareness of triggers, destructive habitual patterns, and “automatic” reactions that seem to control many of our lives. The mindfulness practices in MBRP are designed to help us pause, observe present experience, and bring awareness to the range of choices before each of us in every moment.  We learn to respond in ways that serves us, rather than react in ways that are detrimental to our health and happiness. Ultimately, we are working towards freedom from deeply ingrained and often catastrophic habits.

Similar to Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for depression, MBRP is designed as an aftercare program integrating mindfulness practices and principles with cognitive-behavioral relapse prevention. In our experience, MBRP is best suited to individuals who have undergone initial treatment and wish to maintain their treatment gains and develop a lifestyle that supports their well-being and recovery.

The primary goals of MBRP are: 

1. Develop awareness of personal triggers and habitual reactions, and learn ways to create a pause in this seemingly automatic process. 

2. Change our relationship to discomfort, learning to recognize challenging emotional and physical experiences and responding to them in skillful ways. 

3. Foster a nonjudgmental, compassionate approach toward ourselves and our experiences. 

4. Build a lifestyle that supports both mindfulness practice and recovery.  



This website and these resources are maintained by gifted funds. Any contributions are greatly appreciated!  Your generosity allows us to continue to offer many of our services at no cost.  (Please note: since we do not have nonprofit status, gifts are not tax deductible.)

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