The Wolf and the Lamb

Terence T. Gorski, Author
A Personal comment and passing on
the Aesop Fable and The Moral of the Story

Wolf_and_Lamb_01

The Wolf and the Lamb
When Hunger Drives Conflict
Who Wins?

“A tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny. So it is useless for the innocent to seek justice through reasoning when the oppressor intends to be unjust.” ~ Aesop

The Wolf and the Lamb is the fable that Illustrates this moral. It was written by Aesop and used to educate millions of children into the realities of life. The popularity of Aesop Fables faded as political correctness began replacing reality with the art of lying about the nature of life to avoid offending others.

Jesus taught in the New Testament that the day would come when the world and the world and the lamb can lie down in peace together. I wish that were true. I must simply say perhaps some day, but not in this lifetime. When both the wolf and sheep start getting hungry and all that is left for food is each other – that’s when the trouble starts. In this battle, who do you think will win?

We were created by a loving God.  We we were cast into a world where life must feed upon life in order to survive.  We are told by God Incarnate or the prophets of God to love one another. All of these original messengers were violently and horrible killed by the political  wolves of their day. So my humble message, which may be wrong, is love one another and beware of the big bad wolf. Trust God and lock your car.

I do acknowledge that when wolves and dogs are well fed they can be peaceful. When hunger laws at their bellies they form into packs and go searching for food. That’s canine version of a human mob. They hunt and kill relentlessly and without mercy. So I guess my revised opinion, which also may be wrong, is this: we need to beware the big bad wolf and also beware the human mobs.

I really want George or wells vision of tyranny toe be wrong. I just know that in a battle between a wold and lamb, the world usually wins. There is no reasoning with a hungry monster when they come to visit. Out core survival responses urge to fight, run, or freeze and hide.

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

An Aesop Fable

While lapping water at the head of a running brook, a wolf noticed a stray lamb some distance down the stream. Once he made up his mind to attack her, he began thinking of a plausible excuse for making her his prey.

“Scoundrel!”, he cried, running up to her. “How dare you muddle the water that I am drinking!”

“Please forgive me,” replied the lamb meekly, “but I don’t see how I could have done anything to the water since it runs from you to me, not from me to you.”

“Be that as it may,” the wolf retorted, “but you know it was only a year ago that you called me many bad names behind my back.”

“Oh, sir,” said the lamb, “I wasn’t even born a year ago.”

“Well,” the wolf asserted, “if it wasn’t you, it was your mother, and that’s all the same to me. Anyway, it’s no use trying to argue me out of my supper.”

And without another word, he fell upon the poor helpless lamb and tore her to pieces.

THE MORAL OF THIS STORY IS:
“A tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny. So it is useless for the innocent to seek justice through reasoning when the oppressor intends to be unjust.” ~ Aesop

One Response to The Wolf and the Lamb

  1. […] “A tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny. So it is useless for the innocent to seek justi… ~ Aesop […]

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