Caring, Commitment, and Boundaries

By Terence T. Gorski, Author
December 9, 2013

When we care and become committed to other people we connect with them in a real but not physical way. As a result we feel for them, feel with them, and have an emotional commitment to their well being. As a result, it is difficult to be objective, set boundaries, and set appropriate limits. We are vulnerable to manipulation. Only honest communication with close friends who know us well can help us to keep a realistic perspective.

The fear of telling the truth to close trusted friends about those we love is a warning sign that something is wrong.

How to set and keep healthy boundaries is explained in the book:

Getting Love Right, a five star rating at Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0671864157

6 Responses to Caring, Commitment, and Boundaries

  1. I was a bit leary abut the title “Getting Love Right: Learning the Choices of Healthy Intimacy”. but when I started reading the sample on Amazon I couldn’t stop reading and when you got on the subject of dysfunctional families I couldn’t help but reminisce about my childhood. I’ll be adding this book to my repertoire of a must-read real soon. Thx

    • Terry Gorski says:

      The title has always made me uncomfortable. It was sold to me by my literary agent and the publisher. I would have settled for “Getting It a Little Bit Better” or “Struggle On – That’s What Romantic Love Is All About.” I gave into to their expert opinion.

      • No, I think the agent was right, the word “intimacy” works for the targeted audience…woman. To gut guys to read it all you needed to say was “sex” LOL.

      • Terry Gorski says:

        Sex and men — yes. “Men were created with two heads, but only sufficient blood flow to use one at a time.” ~ Robin Williams

      • Terry Gorski says:

        There are many different ways to help people develop a more helpful idea about what factors, biological and psychosocial, drove their addiction and contributed to relapse when they tried to stop. The right model to use is the one the person you are trying to help understands and help the pieces of his personal puzzle of recovery to start coming together.

    • Terry Gorski says:

      Thanks for the kinds words.

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